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20130124
20130124
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-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
friends are passing away. and untold thousands never recovery taxing and burr denying communities. for more than years the club has had more than their fill of taking care of sick folks. alcohol is every few feet in this area. some are able to drink in moderation and we applaud them but the country club serves as an alternative to bars and others ways of life. currently fiscally we're entirely strafd by our own volunteers. we want to keep the club open 3 hundred and 65 days a year. the second level flat club has a small meeting room and every scooter is very important. for many years we have could existed with our neighbors. we have over 25 step meetings every week and thank you, sir and if you could only is one more thing. i can tell you about the hopeless individuals i see on the sidewalks of people everyday indeed i was one of them >> at the next speaker please. good afternoon vice president wu and members of the commission my name is is christopher i'm the treasurer of the castro club. castro country club is a community space open to all people. we have over 35 recovery meeti
at the current way you have to have revenues that take care of taxes. i know that we're also trying to get rid of a trans sit person so we're glad to have other consistent resources for people. if you're willing to close off the back of the restaurant so people are not in the backyard that would annoy the neighbors then it sounds like we can just close that off that it would be a project to work for everybody but i want to hear what other commiserations have to say. i am supporting the project >> the first floor i guess the addition to the restaurant i'm okay with the country club kind of legitimization and use. the back seems to be awkward. what is proposed and allowed. i mean leaving that 5 foot space open is awkward it's so small. its act ward to have this 5 foot space. is that allowed? >> under the planning code section 134 castro street neighborhood commercial district would not require if there the no commercial use on the ground floor so - the 5 foot is like a light well, it goes all the way to the sky and it is provided by the project sponsor. >> what was the building on hartford st
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> thank you kindly. as an ex-felon, it's not my first effort with a public defender in public for a bunch of people who i know are working hard to make this substance abuse incarceration cognitive behavior thing work all together. i started doing my career in rehabs and jails and shelters and where i live. it's a privilege to work for people who chose to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the
with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mea
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6